How to Cite a Chapter in Chicago/Turabian

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If you are writing a research paper, there’s a very good chance you’ll need to cite a chapter or other part of a book. In this guide, you’ll find what you need in order to make chapter citations  according to the latest Chicago/Turabian style standards.

 Here you’ll find examples of various types of citations for both the notes and bibliography format  and the author-date format as defined in the Chicago Manual of style:

  • chapter in a single-author book
  • article in a multi author book
  • work in an anthology
  • introduction, preface, afterword, or similar part of a book
  • letters in published collections

When citing a section of a book, you include the author’s name followed by the title of the section or chapter enclosed in quotation marks. The italicized title of the complete work/book comes next after the word “in.” In a bibliography or reference list, you’ll need to include the page range or specific chapter number of the part of the book you are citing. However, you only include the page(s) you are citing in your footnotes or endnotes or in-text citation. Here’s a simple citation structure example for the different styles:

Bibliography: 

Author Last Name, First Name. “Chapter Title.” In Book Title, page range of chapter. City: Publisher, Year

Footnotes: 

Author First Name Last Name, “Chapter Title,” in Book Title (City: Publisher, Year), page(s) cited.

References: 

Author Last Name, First Name. Year. “Chapter Title.” In Book Title, page range of chapter. City: Publisher.

In-text: 

(Author Last Name Year, page(s) cited)

 

You don’t always need to cite the specific part of a book you are using. It’s often sufficient to just cite the work as a whole. If the article or chapter plays a large role in your paper, then it is a good idea to cite the specific part. Generally, you want to cite individual articles separately and chapters within a single-author book are more commonly cited as just the whole work.

Chapter in a single-author book

If you use a chapter in a book that is particularly significant for your project, you may find it useful to cite just that chapter in the text and in your list of works cited. This shows anyone who is reading your paper that this chapter is very important for your research. You can check out CMOS 14.106 and Turabian 17.1.8.1 and 19.1.9.1 for more examples.

Bibliography: 

Serviss, Garrett P. “A Trip of Terror.” In A Columbus of Space, 17-32. New York: Appleton, 1911.

Footnotes: 

Garrett P. Serviss, “A Trip of Terror,” in A Columbus of Space (New York: Appleton, 1911), 19.

References: 

Serviss, Garrett P. 1911 “A Trip of Terror.” In A Columbus of Space, 17-32. New York: Appleton.

In-text: 

(Serviss 1911, 19)

 

Article in a multi author book

For articles in a multi author book, you follow a similar format. One big difference is that you use the name of the author of the part in the main entry. After “in,” you then include the title of the work the part is in, as well as information on the editors or translators, followed by the page range.

Bibliography: 

Oram, Richard W. “Writers’ Libraries: Historical Overview and Curatorial Considerations.” In Collecting, Curating, and Researching Writers’ Libraries: A Handbook, edited by Richard W. Oram and Joseph Nicholson, 1-28. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2014.

Footnotes: 

Richard W. Oram, “Writers’ Libraries: Historical Overview and Curatorial Considerations,” in Collecting, Curating, and Researching Writers’ Libraries: A Handbook, ed. Richard W. Oram and Joseph Nicholson (Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2014), 15.

References: 

Oram, Richard W. 2014. “Writers’ Libraries: Historical Overview and Curatorial Considerations.” In Collecting, Curating, and Researching Writers’ Libraries: A Handbook, edited by Richard W. Oram and Joseph Nicholson, 1-28. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield.

In-text: 

(Oram 2014, 15)

 

If you use multiple articles in a multi author work, you should include a citation to the entire work in your bibliography or reference list and then you can include a shortened form of each individual chapter (See CMOS 14.108; Turabian 17.1.8.2 and 19.1.8.2). Here’s an example:

Bibliography full citation: 

Oram, Richard W., and Joseph Nicholson, eds. Collecting, Curating, and Researching Writers’ Libraries: A Handbook. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2014.

Bibliography shortened form for an article in the multi author work: 

Oram, Richard W. “Writers’ Libraries: Historical Overview and Curatorial Considerations.” In Oram and Nicholson, 1-28.

References full citation: 

Oram, Richard W., and Joseph Nicholson, eds. 2014. Collecting, Curating, and Researching Writers’ Libraries: A Handbook. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield.

References shortened form for an article in the multi author work:

Oram, Richard W. 2014. “Writers’ Libraries: Historical Overview and Curatorial Considerations.” In Oram and Nicholson 2014, 1-28.

 

Work in an anthology

For a work in an anthology, cite just as you would for a chapter of a multi author book. The work title will be in roman in quotation marks. If the work in the anthology is book-length, the work title should be in italics, rather than roman.

Bibliography: 

Dillard, Annie. “Living Like Weasels.” In Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: Work from 1970 to Present, edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone, 148-51. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2007.

Footnotes: 

Annie Dillard, “Living Like Weasels,” in Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: Work from 1970 to Present, ed. Lex Williford and Michael Martone (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2007), 149.

References: 

Dillard, Annie. 2007. “Living Like Weasels.” In Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: Work from 1970 to Present, edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone, 148-51. New York: Simon & Schuster.

In-text: 

(Dillard 2007, 149)

 

Introduction, preface, afterword, or similar part of a book

Some books include sections at the beginning or end that are not considered to be part of the main text, such as an introduction, preface, foreword, or afterword. These are also sometimes written by someone other than the main author. If you want to cite a part of a book that is one of these non-specific titles, you include the term used to describe the part in your citation. If the author of the part you are citing is the same as the author of the whole book, only include the citation of the book as a whole in the bibliography or references list. See CMOS 14.110 and Turabian 17.1.8.1 and 19.1.9.1 for more information and examples.

Bibliography: 

Yeo, Geoffrey. Foreword to Archives: Principles and Practices, by Laura A. Millar, vii-x. New York: Neal-Schumann, 2004.

Footnotes: 

Geoffrey Yeo, foreword to Archives: Principles and Practices, by Laura A. Millar (New York: Neal-Schumann, 2004), viii.

References: 

Yeo, Geoffrey. 2004. Foreword to Archives: Principles and Practices, by Laura A. Millar, vii-x. New York: Neal-Schumann.

In-text: 

(Yeo 2004, viii)

 

Letters in a published collection

Some books include collections of letters a single person has written or letters on a specific subject. You can cite individual letters similarly to citing a chapter. You begin your citation with the names of the sender and the recipient, then the date of the letter, followed by the information about the book the letter is published in. Only include the citation to the whole book in your bibliography or reference list. For citations in author-date style, the date of the letter needs to be worked into the text because the reference list will only include the citation of the complete book. See CMOS 14.111 and Turabian 17.1.9 and 19.1.9.4 for more information.

Bibliography: 

Meynell, Alice. The Selected Letters of Alice Meynell. Edited by Damian Atkinson. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013.

Footnotes: 

Alice Meynell to Christiana Thompson, March 1, 1858, in The Selected Letters of Alice Meynell, ed. Damian Atkinson (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013), 14.

References: 

Meynell, Alice. 2013. The Selected Letters of Alice Meynell. Edited by Damian Atkinson. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

In-text: 

On March 1, 1858, Alice Meynell wrote a letter to her mother detailing her safe arrival (Meynell 2013, 14).

 


Bibliography

The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017. https://doi.org/10.7208/cmos17.

Turabian, Kate L. A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 9th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018. 


Published October 31, 2011. Updated May 15, 2020.

Written by Janice Hansen. Janice has a doctorate in literature and a master’s degree in library science. She spends a lot of time with rare books and citations.

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