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Chicago Style: Notes and In-Text Citations

 

Chicago/Turabian Basics: Notes

Why we include in-text citations and notes

Researchers include brief citations in their writing to acknowledge references to other people’s work. Generally, Chicago uses either footnotes or endnotes (or both) to give credit in text.

Citations are:

  • Indicated by a superscript numeral in the text
  • Listed in the footnote/endnote in standard font size
  • Numbered consecutively
  • Placed at the end of a sentence/clause
  • Placed after quotation marks and punctuation…
  • …Except dashes, where they are placed before

Example of references cited in text:

Great efforts have been put forth to save giant pandas in recent decades. The Chan Foundation for Panda Livelihood contributed over $20,000 to the San Diego Zoo last year to ensure that its Panda Cam would operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.1 President Danny Chan said, “Now people from all over the world can see the fascinating behavior of pandas, such as eating bamboo and sleeping whenever they want.”2

Example of corresponding notes:

1. Danny Chan. My Philanthropic Life: Helping the World Through Panda Rescues (New York: Scribner), 123.

2. Michele Kirschenbaum, “How One Man Saved Many Pandas,” Journal of Animal News 67 (2014): 12.

This chapter provides a general overview of formatting notes using the Chicago Manual of Style. For complete information, refer to Section 14 of the CMoS.


Note structure for a book

*Note: The following author formatting can be applied to other source types, as well.

One author

First name Last name, Book Title (City of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication): Pages Cited.

Two or three authors

First name Last name and First name Last name, Book Title (City of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication): Pages Cited.

Four or more authors

First name Last name et al., Book Title (City of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication): Pages Cited.

Editor/translator/compiler with no author

First name Last name ed./trans./comp., Book Title (City of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication): Pages Cited.

*Also see page 2 of this guide.

Editor/translator/compiler with an author

Author First name Last name, Book Title, ed./trans./comp. First name Last name (City of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication): Pages Cited.


Note structure for a scholarly journal article

First name Last name, “Article Title,” Journal Title Volume, no. Issue (Year of Publication): Page(s).

Online journal

First name Last name, “Article Title,” Journal Title Volume, no. Issue (Year of Publication): Page(s), doi: XXXX OR URL.


Note structure for a newspaper/magazine article

First name Last name, “Article Title,” Publication Title, Month Date, Year of Publication, Page(s).


Note structure for a thesis or dissertation

First name Last name, “Title of Dissertation” (PhD diss., University Name, Year).

*The CMoS has many suggestions for formatting notes of musical recordings. See Section 14.276.


Note structure for a musical recording

First name Last name or Group, Recording Title, recorded Month Date, Year.


Tips for Formatting Your Bibliography

Once you’ve compiled your footnotes or endnotes, you may need to compile these references in a bibliography.

Chicago style bibliographies are:

    • Arranged alphabetically
    • Placed at the end of a paper, before the index
    • Formatted with the word “Bibliography” centered at the top of the page
      • You may also use “Works Cited” or “Literature Cited” if works not used in your paper are not listed on this page.